If you have any questions about international social security agreements, please contact the Office of International Social Security Programs at 410-965-3322 or 410-965-7306. However, do not call these numbers if you want to inquire about a right to an individual benefit. All of these agreements are based on the concept of shared responsibility. Responsibility-sharing agreements are reciprocal. Under each agreement, partner countries make concessions to their social security qualification rules so that those covered by the agreement have access to payments that they may not be eligible for. The responsibility for social security is thus distributed among the countries in which a person has lived during his or her working years and where the person is able to obtain potential rights. In general, it is possible to access a pension from one country in the second country, although the paying country retains some discretion with regard to the exchange and delivery mechanisms used. The agreements allow sSA to add U.S. and foreign coverage credits only if the worker has at least six-quarters of U.S. coverage.

Similarly, a person may need a minimum amount of coverage under the foreign system to have U.S. coverage accounted for in order to meet the conditions for granting foreign benefits. If you want more information on the U.S. Social Security Totalization Program – including details of the concrete agreements in force – you should write: Although agreements with Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and Japan do not use the residency rule as the primary determinant of self-employment coverage, each of them contains a provision guaranteeing that workers are insured and taxed in a single country. For more information on these agreements, click here on our website or in writing to the Social Security Administration (SSA) under the Conclusion section, below. Since the late 1970s, the United States has established a network of bilateral social security agreements that coordinate the U.S. social security program with similar programs in other countries. This article provides a brief overview of the agreements and should be of particular interest to multinationals and people who work abroad during their careers. Agreements to coordinate social protection across national borders have been commonplace in Western Europe for decades. This is followed by a list of the agreements reached by the United States and the effective date of each. Some of these agreements were then revised; The date indicated is the date on which the original agreement came into force. In addition to improving the social security of working workers, international social security agreements help ensure continuity of benefit protection for people who have received social security credits under the U.S.

system and another country. You can also write to this address if you want to propose negotiating new agreements with certain countries. In developing its negotiating plans, the SSA attaches considerable importance to the interests of workers and employers who will be affected by potential agreements. Such agreements create a legal framework for the coordination of social security systems between countries. They provide the legal framework to protect the rights of migrant workers and fill gaps in social security. The agreements ensure that periods of employment in other signatory countries are taken into account in the granting of the right to social benefits for migrant workers who depend on the completion of a qualification period.