Some Spanish adjectives used to describe male and female names are: Amable (art), Difécil (difficult), Fecil (light), Flexible, Paciente (patient), Green (green). Even most numbers, with the exception of number one, which will change at the UN if they are used before a male name, and to una before a female name, z.B. “A amigo” and “Una amiga” I know that many of us do not remember the class 6 English class and the difference between a name, an adjective , a verb and so on. It`s just useless information that we never use in real life, you say? Now that you are learning Spanish, your life will be much easier if you understand these terms. So let`s make a brief summary. Let`s look at an example of nobiss and look at the issues. Possessive forms such as meo (mine) and Tuyo (your) also function as Spanish adjectives. However, the difference is that possessive ususally only comes in verbs in complete clauses (although there are exceptions). If this happens, the owner must have the same purpose as the name. Some examples of possessives used as adjectives: making a female male adjective is even simpler.

Just follow these steps: However… some adjectives (endings in [-ista], [-e] or [-l]) do not extinguish [-a] and [-o] for men and women. Be careful. The plural-Spanish adjectives always end in -s, whether -, -os or -as. Again, it will be -os for male adjectives, as for female adjectives. The plural adjectives that end up on -it can be either male or female. There are some adjectives that are known as variable adjectives that do not change in shape. Most of them are either unusual colors or words of foreign origin. An example is web ace in the web pegina (the website) and read web peginas (web pages). Sometimes a name can be used as an immutable adjective, but this practice is much less common in Spanish than in English. Being a Spanish student will rarely have the need to use immutable adjectives, but you should be aware that they exist so that they don`t confuse you when you see them.

Some examples of common Spanish male adjectives are: Afortunado (luck), Alto (top), Bajo (short), Bueno (Bien), Estupendo (awesome), Famoso (famous), Malo (bad) and Pequeo (small) Of course, there are thousands of other adjectives in Spanish. But if you start learning the basics like Spanish colors, feelings and personal descriptions, then you will have covered most of the daily conversations. Finally, there are a small number of adjectives that appear only in front of the noun or according to a verb. These are usually superlative adjectives. These adjectives change into plural forms in front of plural substrates, but they do not change regardless of the sex of the noun. As mentioned above, Spanish adjectives generally have a singular shape and a plural form. The rules are exactly the same ones that are used to form the plural of names. To illustrate this, for a phrase like “She`s a beautiful model,” we would say “Ella`s una modelo hermosa,” but for many models we have to say “Ellas sounds without hermosas mode.” Note that all words, including the pronous subject and the verb SER, will change, so that there is an adjective agreement of Spanish Noun and that the sentence is judicious. A taco es una preparacién mexicana que en su forma esténdar consists of a tortilla containing algen foodo dentro. (A taco is a Mexican formula that, in its standard form, consists of a tortilla containing some food.